2016 N.H. Climate Summit focuses on adaptation

Story by Rebecca Zeiber, N.H. Sea Grant Science Writer

Rachel Gittman speaks to the audience about living shorelines vs. shoreline hardening. Photo by Rebecca Zeiber

Keynote Speaker Dr. Rachel Gittman speaks to the audience about living shorelines vs. shoreline hardening. Photo by Rebecca Zeiber

Roads, dunes, groundwater and fish — N.H.’s infrastructure and natural resources are not immune to the effects of climate change, but adaptation efforts are growing and gaining momentum in the Granite State. That growth was evident at the 2016 N.H. Climate Summit, where more than 115 attendees convened at the Great Bay Discovery Center in Greenland, N.H. on May 13th for a day-long event that focused on “the many faces of adaptation.”

The summit, now in its fifth year, began with a charge from Cory Riley, manager of the Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve: “We need to remain fluid, nimble and adaptable ourselves,” she said, “and we should continue to grow in our connections and learning.”

Representatives from federal, state and local government were in attendance, as well as scientists, town managers and concerned citizens who took notes, asked questions and listened intently throughout the day’s presentations. The summit struck a balance between science and action with underlying themes of planning and “no-regrets decision-making” that will benefit N.H. residents and natural resources alike. To continue this story, click here.

, , , , , , , , , ,